7 Lists to get things done as a Business Analyst

For a long time, I had difficulties using my lists effectively. I had a lot of lists to manage various aspects of my work, but it was hard for me to extract useful data from those lists. Moreover, I had so many lists that even though I had created those lists to help me, I was spending too much time trying to find the right list to get the information I needed. In the end, many of those lists ended up in my trash can because they were not useful at all.

Then, I came across a small book by David Allen, Getting Things Done (GTD). In his book, David suggests a simple 5-step process to deal with the information we constantly receive (i.e. the stuff) and how to handle this stuff with simple lists. There is no magic behind GTD, but by following his tips, I’ve been able to dramatically improve the way I use my own lists, and improve the quality of my work as a BA.

Find out which 7 lists are helping me on a daily basis.

Using Thinking Styles for better collaboration

Discover your Thinking Style and how to use it for better collaboration with your stakeholders

Most of Business Analysis is about communication & collaboration . I even used to tell my students that our job was 80% communication / 20% analysis! This involves a lot of soft skills in order to be able to identify the best ways to interact with our business & IT stakeholders. This knowledge of your stakeholders is critical if you want to tailor your BA approach and optimize your work.

One of the easiest ways to improve your knowledge about your stakeholders is to use the formal organizational chart and the informal one. In some organizations, managers are also performing personality/behavior/influence tests to help their employees to better know each other and improve the performance of their team. However, there’s no easy way to assess how others think and what part of their work motivates them.

A new model attempts to solve this problem. Let’s learn more about the Workplace Thinking Styles, and what they mean for Business Analysts.

Should Business Analysts fear Artificial Intelligence?

Artificial Intelligence (AI) is a trendy subject these days. Major companies are setting up AI labs everywhere to accelerate research and identify new growth opportunities in their industries. New jobs are being created to support this growing field, and schools from around the world are launching new programs to train the next generation of workers.

While it all seems positive, artificial intelligence often means job automation. As a consequence, many active workers need to shift their career (if they’re lucky enough) or just lose their job. Moreover, many traditional (and non-traditional) professions are being challenged by the AI train.

But what about Business Analysis? Are BAs at risk of losing their job to Artificial Intelligence in a near future? What could we do to ensure our relevance going into the 21st century? Let the AI vs BA face-off begin!